Book Review: The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas

 

5_DiscoBalls

5 disco balls

The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas
Published: February 28, 2017 by Balzer + Bray
Purchase: Amazon or BOTM add on hardcover for $9.99
Goodreads Choice 2017 winner for both Debut Goodreads Author & YA Fiction
2017 National Book Award Longlist, Young People’s Literature

A. MUST. READ. I repeat, A. MUST. READ. You’re welcome.

Before I start I just want to say that this book is exceptionally written. Besides the story itself, I’m referring to the writing mechanics (not sure if that’s the right term, but hopefully you understand what I mean). Everything about this book: the flow, structure and pace were perfect. The narrator’s voice felt genuine and real. Each character was developed perfectly and contributed to the story: you are not left with questions at the end. Each character served a purpose, there was no fluff.

Starr Carter is a teenager who balances home life in a poverty stricken neighborhood and her social life where she attends a suburban prep school. She often finds herself not being true to her voice while at school in fear of judgment, but also the same judgment applies when she hangs out in her neighborhood.

One fatal night, she is with her childhood best friend who is shot and killed by a white police officer. Starr is the only witness and besides having to go through her own grief journey, she is being pulled by what others expect of her. In The Hate U Give, Starr is on a journey to find herself: find her voice. She is a strong and smart character whom you will learn a thing or two from.

I cannot for the life of me understand why this book is being banned at some schools. Yes, there may be a bit of cursing but nothing more than some of the other classic books that are required reading in HS. Yes, this book brings to the forefront racism and police brutality/violence but they can’t sweep it under the rug; these stories are happening in the real world and banning a book is not going to change that: having a voice will.

If anything this book presents Starr’s story and the losing and finding of her voice in such a way that exemplifies bravery, courage and empathy.

Fine, you won’t let students read it in school – but you do not give them enough credit: they will read this book on their own – and they should.

A student in Katy, TX – where the book has been banned – organized a Change.org petition to place this book back in the school library. Sign here to help her! Like Starr, Ny’shira, is a strong and courageous young lady who is using her voice. Help her voice be heard.  

This book is currently being turned into a movie: I look forward to seeing how it will turn out.

 

14 thoughts on “Book Review: The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas

  1. Banned in schools?! We’ve all become a bunch of snowflakes… smh. I commend you for reading important books like this that may be tough to read sometimes. Currently – I use reading as a temporary escape from issues like this.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I read this book last year and gave it five stars. I then spoke to someone who had only given it 2 stars. On speaking to the person (she was American and I’m British), she told me that I couldn’t understand the culture in the USA and that the officer did the right thing as they should shoot first ask questions later. I found that really hard to accept. Hopefully a book like this will open peoples eyes.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Banning books is nothing new. At one point all those classic books you referred to have been banned. I worked for years in a HS library. It has a lot to do with which side the loudest parents stand. The hardest part about banning books is this- as a parent, you have every right to decide what your child will read, but you have no right to decide what my child can read. Parents think because their tax dollars pay for a curriculum they have the ultimate say for everyone. This is one of the main reasons I will never go back into a classroom.

    Liked by 2 people

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